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Wednesday, July 1, 2009

2005 Toyota Corolla 1.8L Spark Plug Removal

Click on above picture for larger view.

I received an e-mail from a gentleman in Texas who requested an illustration of how to get to the spark plugs on a 2006 Toyota Corolla with 1.8L engine. A customer came in with a 2005 which is nearly identical. I used it to make the illustration above. The next step after taking out the 10mm bolts holding down the coil boot assemblies is to carefully twist the coil boot assembly with your fingers while pulling upwards. They will come right out. Then you take the spark plugs out. Most of these are the same from 2003 on up through 2009. 

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42 comments:

Charles Gramlich said...

I used to have a Corolla, but not long enough to have to change the plugs.

BernardL said...

This one was in for its 60,000 mile service so the spark plugs do indeed last a lot longer than the old days, Charles.

Matthew Nowlin said...

The 1ZZ-FE's are virtually the same between the 2000-2005 Celica's and the 2002-2008 (and possibly 2009) Corolla's, just to expand on what you said. I have to mark the longblocks so I don't mix them up!

BernardL said...

They are great engines, Matthew. No timing belt and plenty of power.

Michelle said...

Thanks for your informative diagram. I had a question for you. You said previously that the '05 Corolla doesn't have a timing belt, is that correct? The dealer says it needs to be changed at a cost of $250. Any insight?

BernardL said...

I have no idea, Michelle. The 1.8 liter standard engine in the 2005 Corolla does not have a timing belt.

Anonymous said...

I've. Got 90,000 on my 2005 corolla and it still runs great! Haha but it's time to change those plugs and this is going to help a lot. Thanks!

Michelle said...

The car was running just fine @ 110,000. After changing the plugs, I have noticed a reduction in vibration at idle and the car has better pick-up with smoother shifting. Well worth the minimal labor involved!

BernardL said...

That's good news, Michelle. I'm glad your Toyota is running well again. Thanks for the update.

Matthew Nowlin said...

Michelle,
They probably meant the chain needed to be changed. I've heard of needing replacement on some 1ZZFE's, but that is typically at 150K plus.

$250 would be a steal for that though, if it included the labor. A STEAL.

JeffF said...

Thanks, this was a big help. Changed the plugs at 122k.

BernardL said...

I'm glad it worked out for you, Jeff.

Cindi said...

Thank you so much for this!! I went to get plugs and wires for my 2003 corolla and lo and behold, no wires!! Hmm... What to do, they didn't teach coils in auto shop...? LOL!! Your blog has made it all clear. Thanks again.

BernardL said...

I'm glad it worked out for you, Cindi.

Anonymous said...

what is the right spark plug gap and brand for toyota corolla 2009 LE 1.8 ... thnks a lot

BernardL said...

1.1mm

Anonymous said...

I RECEIVED RECALL NOTICE ON '05 COROLLA. WHILE CHECKING MANUAL IT WAS RECOMMEDNED PLUG CHANGE AT 30K MILES AND MINE WAS 40K. BOUGHT SET OF PLUGS AND QUESTONS PART DEALER ON LIFE OF THIS PLUG. HE THOUGHT 100K LIFE. PLEASE WHAT IS THE LIFE OF THESE PLUGS AS I HAVE A SET I MAY NEVER NEED? KPD

BernardL said...

The platinum tipped plugs do have a much longer life, but I don't think it's a good idea to go over 60,000 with them, Anon. I change my own every 30,000 to 40,000 because then I can check on how well they're firing and if there are any accumulated deposits. Remember, even small misfires can eventually wreck the very expensive catalytic converter and build up carbon deposits in the combustion chamber.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the reply. One question what type of tool is needed to take the cover from the top of the engine on the '05 Corolla. I know I don't have one in my tool box. Any sugestion?

BernardL said...

If you don't have a 10mm socket and a ratchet in your tool box, anon, you probably should have a shop do it for you. You can click on the post picture for a larger view.

michael*248 said...

i have a 2003 three with a spun motor..its a chore finding a replacement that doesnt cost more than the vehicle..lol...any advice for my swap?..and..why is the "L" motor twice as expensive as the "R" ..thanks

BernardL said...

I'm not sure I follow you on the L and R thing, unless you mean VIN number. The engine designs have changed through the years on the 1.8 liter but the 1ZZ-FE 1.8 in the 2003 is the same from 2002 to 2008 as Matthew Nowlin pointed out earlier in a comment. In any case, I don't get into why one engine is cheaper or more expensive than another, Michael.

As far as advice goes, if you're going the used engine route, you better make sure you take off the front case. You can then check the timing chain and guides for any damage, along with replacing the water pump before you put it in. I'd also suggest you get a factory manual before you start. It's not a job for amateurs.

Anonymous said...

Can you tell me what the torque spec would be for the plugs on a 2006 Corolla with anti-seaze on the treads? Thanks

BernardL said...

Anon, it's 18 foot pounds torque for the 1ZZ-FE and 13 foot pounds torque for the 2ZZ-GE.

Anonymous said...

What about the two goofy looking plastic head looking things on the back side of the cover, do they turn, pop out (doubt it)or what? 2008 Corolla LE Thanks, Chris

BernardL said...

Here are the instructions, Anon:

1 Turn your engine off and let it cool down for a few minutes. Open your hood and support it using the prop.

2 Remove the four nuts from the plastic engine cover using a pair of pliers or a small socket wrench.

3 Remove the rivets behind the nuts. Gently pry them up using a flathead screwdriver. Keep the nuts and rivets in a cup or bag to avoid losing them.

4 Grasp the sides of the engine cover; lift it straight up to remove it, and then set it down.

5 Reinstall the engine cover by setting it in place, and then reattach the rivets and nuts.

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Anonymous said...

Is 18lb ft the correct torque for plugs on an '09 1.8 also?

Thanks,
Steve

BernardL said...

It's 15 ft lbs for the 2009, Anon.

Anonymous said...

Thanks!

Mickey G. said...

Thank you for this helpful guide. I have a 2003, and learned that the car has long-life iridium tipped plugs as an OEM part with a gap of .044". I purchased platinum tipped plugs recently to replace my aged plugs, but do you know if I will need to gap these any differently from the iridium plug spec? I figured I'd better ask before diving into the job, just in case. Thanks in advance!

BernardL said...

It's the same spec no matter what kind of plug you use, Mickey.

Anonymous said...

This was very helpful for me, thanks. One problem though. I noticed a lose wire with a hose casing that came from the left side of the block. It's connected to the sparkplug wires. I noticed this wire just hanging free towards the back of the engine. Not sure what to do with it because I couldn't find a place to plug it in. It had a connector on it with a boot to go over.

BernardL said...

It might be a spare harness connector, anon, for a different engine configuration. I have no way of knowing though.

Anonymous said...

Hi i am planning to buy toyota corolla 2005 model. it seems the owner has not changed the spark plug yet. it has already covered 90000miles. whehen you think the plugs would need a change?
Amit

BernardL said...

Now, Anon, along with all other checks that go along with a 90,000 mile check.

Anonymous said...

I have a 2007 Toyota Corolla. What are the torque specs for the coil pack mounting bolts?

Bernard Lee DeLeo said...

There are no torque spec's for the coil pack, Anon. Logic would dictate by the small size of the screws a little past snug would be fine.

Anonymous said...

I have a 2006 Corolla. How often do I need to change my spark plug wire set? How can I tell if they need to be replaced?

Bernard Lee DeLeo said...

There is no spark plug wire set, Anon. It's a COP system (Coil on Plug). If you had a ford 4.6L engine with COP's I'd tell you to change them all when you replaced the spark plugs. On the Toyota, their individual coil assemblies seem to last.